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King John IV of Portugal: Crux fidelis

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Description: The Choir of Somerville College, OxfordDavid Crown, conductorWells Cathedral, 6 July 2011Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/somervillechoirWebsite: http://www.somervillemusicsociety.com

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Free MP3 Download of King John IV of Portugal: Crux fidelis high quality MP4

The Victoria Consort live in concert at St Peter's Cathedral: "CRUCIFIXUS," 2/4/2012.

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King Joao IV of Portugal - Crux fidelis

King Joao IV of Portugal - Crux fidelis

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Manuel Cardoso: Lamentatio

Manuel Cardoso (baptized 11 December 1566 24 November 1650) was a Portuguese composer and organist. With Duarte Lobo and John IV of Portugal, he represented the "golden age" of Portuguese polyphony. Cardoso was born in Fronteira, near Portalegre, most likely in 1566. He attended the Colégio dos Moços do Coro, a choir school associated with the Évora cathedral, studying with Manuel Mendes and Cosme Delgado. In 1588 he joined the Carmelite order, taking his vows in 1589. In the early 1620s he was resident at the ducal household of Vila Viçosa, where he was befriended by the Duke of Barcelos—later to become King John IV. For most of his career he was the resident composer and organist at the Carmelite Convento do Carmo in Lisbon. Cardoso's works are models of Palestrinian polyphony, and are written in a refined, precise style which completely ignores the development of the Baroque idiom elsewhere in Europe. His style has much in common with Tomás Luis de Victoria, in its careful treatment of dissonance, occasional polychoral writing, and frequent cross-relations, which were curiously common among both Iberian and English composers of the time. Three books of masses survive; many of the works are based on motets written by King John IV himself, and others are based on motets by Palestrina. Cardoso was widely published, often with the help of King John IV to defray costs. Many of his works—especially the elaborate polychoral compositions, which probably were the most ...

micrologus2
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12:56
João Lourenço Rebelo: Lamentations for Maundy Thursday

João Lourenço Rebelo, or João Soares Rebelo, (1610 -- 16 November 1665) was court composer to John IV of Portugal (1603--1656). Rebelo was born in Caminha in 1610. He entered the service of Teodósio II, Duke of Braganza in 1624 at the age of fourteen, then became music teacher to his son, who was to become João II, 8th Duke of Braganza in 1630. Rebelo continued to develop as a musician and composer, becoming master of the ducal chapel at Vila Viçosa. On 1 December 1640 João became King John IV of Portugal and Rebelo transferred to the royal chapel where he continued to foster the King's interest in music and his gifts as a composer. In 1646 Rebelo was made a nobleman, fidalgo-cavaleiro of the Casa Real. Later he was elevated to a commander of the Order of Christ, a position with significant financial benefits. John IV also honored Rebelo by having his music published, and by dedicating his own first musical treatise to the composer. Rebelo died at Apelação (Loures) on 16 November 1661. Both King John IV and Rebelo's brother, the chaplain and singer padre Marcos Soares Pereira, predeceased him in 1656. Rebelo wrote a large amount of sacred music, including a 39-voice mass for John IV's 39th birthday. Some of this music was lost in the Lisbon earthquake of November 1, 1755. Huelgas Ensemble, dir. Paul Van Nevel

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João Lourenço Rebelo "Lauda Jerusalem" à 16

Rebelo was born in Caminha in 1610. He entered the service of Teodósio II, Duke of Braganza in 1624 at the age of fourteen, then became music teacher to his son, who was to become João II, Duke of Braganza in 1630. Rebelo continued to develop as a musician and composer, becoming master of the ducal chapel at Vila Viçosa. On 1 December 1640 João became King John IV of Portugal and Rebelo transferred to the royal chapel where he continued to foster the King's interest in music and his gifts as a composer. In 1646 Rebelo was made a nobleman, fidalgo-cavaleiro of the Casa Real. Later he was elevated to a commander of the Order of Christ, a position with significant financial benefits. John IV also honored Rebelo by having his music published, and by dedicating his own first musical treatise to the composer. Rebelo died at Apelacão on 16 November 1661. Both his brother, the chaplain and singer Padre Marcos Soares Pereira, and King John IV predeceased him in 1656. ***** "Lauda Jerusalem" à 16 Performed : Huelgas Ensemble Dir : Paul Van Nevel ***** Image : Giulio Romano, La Chute des Titans (détail), 1526-35 Mantua, Palazzo del Te, Sala dei Giganti

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Choir of New College, Oxford - Quid hic statis

Manuel Cardoso (baptized December 11, 1566 November 24, 1650) was a Portuguese composer and organist. Along with Duarte Lobo and John IV of Portugal, he represented the "golden age" of Portuguese polyphony. Cardoso was born in Fronteira, near Portalegre, most likely in 1566. He attended the Colégio dos Moços do Coro, a choir school associated with the Évora cathedral, studying with Manuel Mendes and Cosme Delgado. In 1588 he joined the Carmelite order, taking his vows in 1589. In the early 1620s he was resident at the ducal household of Vila Viçosa, where he was befriended by the Duke of Barcelos—later to become King John IV. For most of his career he was resident composer and organist at the Carmelite Convento do Carmo in Lisbon. Cardoso's works are models of Palestrinian polyphony, and are written in a refined, precise style which completely ignores the development of the Baroque idiom elsewhere in Europe. His style has much in common with Victoria, in its careful treatment of dissonance, occasional polychoral writing, and frequent cross-relations, which were curiously common among both Iberian and English composers of the time. Three books of masses survive; many of the works are based on motets written by King John IV himself, and others are based on motets by Palestrina. Cardoso was widely published, often with the help of King John IV to defray costs. Many of his works—especially the elaborate polychoral compositions, which probably were the most progressive—were ...

treblechoir99
3,188 views
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Manuel Cardoso: Magnificat Secuni Toni (2)

Manuel Cardoso (baptized 11 December 1566 24 November 1650) was a Portuguese composer and organist. With Duarte Lobo and John IV of Portugal, he represented the "golden age" of Portuguese polyphony. Cardoso was born in Fronteira, near Portalegre, most likely in 1566. He attended the Colégio dos Moços do Coro, a choir school associated with the Évora cathedral, studying with Manuel Mendes and Cosme Delgado. In 1588 he joined the Carmelite order, taking his vows in 1589. In the early 1620s he was resident at the ducal household of Vila Viçosa, where he was befriended by the Duke of Barcelos—later to become King John IV. For most of his career he was the resident composer and organist at the Carmelite Convento do Carmo in Lisbon. Cardoso's works are models of Palestrinian polyphony, and are written in a refined, precise style which completely ignores the development of the Baroque idiom elsewhere in Europe. His style has much in common with Tomás Luis de Victoria, in its careful treatment of dissonance, occasional polychoral writing, and frequent cross-relations, which were curiously common among both Iberian and English composers of the time. Three books of masses survive; many of the works are based on motets written by King John IV himself, and others are based on motets by Palestrina. Cardoso was widely published, often with the help of King John IV to defray costs. Many of his works—especially the elaborate polychoral compositions, which probably were the most ...

micrologus2
2,335 views
19 Dec 2009
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2:11
3:28
Mario Lanza - O, Come All Ye Faithful - Adeste Fideles

May you enjoy this magnificent Christmas carol sung by the great Mario Lanza. Photos of Mario Lanza and paintings by master artists appropriate to the song lyrics accompany Mario's heavenly voice. Exactly who wrote the hymn, Adeste Fideles, is not clear. "The most commonly named Portuguese author is King John IV of Portugal (Portuguese: João IV de Portugal, pronounced: [ʒuˈɐ̃w̃]). "The Musician King" (1603--1656, came to the throne in 1640) was a patron of music and the arts, and a considerably sophisticated writer on music; in addition, he was a composer, and during his reign he collected one of the largest libraries in the world (destroyed in the Lisbon earthquake of 1755). The first part of his musical work was published in 1649. He founded a Music School in Vila Viçosa that "exported" musicians to Spain and Italy and it was there at his Vila Viçosa palace that the two manuscripts of the "Portuguese Hymn" have been found". (Quote is from: en.wikipedia.org Photos of Mario Lanza are from "The Great Caruso". The film is available for purchase from Turner Classic Movies. The other photographs are of the exterior and interior of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. The master artists and their paintings are listed below in the order of their appearance in the video: 1) Paolo Veronese (1528-88) - Adoration of the Magi, 1573 2) Abraham Bloemaert (1564 -1651) - Adoration Of The Magi, (1623 - 1624) 3) Leonaert Bramer (1596-1674) - The Three Kings en route to Bethlehem, c. 1640 4 ...

MegaMusiclover1234
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19 Nov 2011
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9:55
Free MP3 Download of João IV de Portugal - Crux fidelis high quality MP4

João IV de Portugal (Vila Viçosa, 1604 - Lisboa, 1656) Intérpretes: The King's Singers Crux fidelis inter omnes, arbor una nobilis. Nulla silva talem profert fronde, flore, germine. Dulce lignum, dulces clavos, dulce pondus sustinet. Flecte ramos, arbor alta, tensa laxa viscera....

sh4m69
3,732 views
24 Aug 2011
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Free MP3 Download of Luis De Freitas Branco - Symphony No. 1 (1924) high quality MP4

Conducted by Alvaro Cassuto with the Ireland RTE National Symphony Orchestra. I. Adagio - Allegro Molto - 00:00 II. Andante - 12:54 III. Allegro Molto Vivace - 24:43 "Born into an aristocratic family with ties to the royal family for many centuries, Luís de Freitas Branco enjoyed a highly sophisticated education, which included studies both in Berlin and then in Paris, where he worked with composers including Engelbert Humperdinck and Désiré Pâque. He started composing at a very early stage, as reflected in his Scherzo Fantastique, written in 1907 at the age of seventeen, one year before the homonymous work by Igor Stravinsky, which dates from 1908. He was active also as a leading force in the restructuring of musical education at the Lisbon Conservatory of Music, of which he became the deputy director under the leadership of José Vianna da Motta, a celebrated pianist who was one of Franz Liszt's more distinguished students. Freitas Branco also played a significant rôle as a musicologist, having been active in research into the rich legacy of Portuguese polyphonic composers of the seventeenth century and publishing a book about the works of King John IV of Portugal, himself a distinguished composer and promoter of new music of his time." "His musical development began with the influence of French late Romantic composers and some of the Impressionists such as Debussy. Yet, aware of the importance of introducing into Portuguese music large scale works such as symphonies for ...

GoldieG89
4,007 views
08 Jan 2012
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8:39
Catherine of Braganza, the Portuguese Queen of England [Gresham lecture by Professor Thomas Earle]

The story of Catherine of Braganza (1638-1705) and the fraught political relations between England and Portugal. At the age of 24, Catarina de Bragança (as it is in Portuguese), married a man she had never met and became the Queen consort of King Charles II, King of England. Catholic and cultured in a country which was Protestant and distinctly uncultured by mainland European standards, Catherine went on to suffer 23 years of unhappy marriage as King Charles took numerous lovers and even contributed to the anti-papist consiracy theories that sought to overthrow her. Professor Thomas Earle, King John II Professor of Portuguese Studies at the University of Oxford, here delivers a City of London Festival lecture at Gresham College on the political background to Catherine's marriage into the British monarchy. This is a part of 'Portugal and England, 1386-2010: A complex web of political, economic and intellectual relations'. The full lecture is available for free download (along withall of our other lectures) in its complete form from the Gresham College website, in video, audio or text formats: www.gresham.ac.uk Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website.

GreshamCollege
3,351 views
12 Jul 2010
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4:09
Filipe de Magalhães: Missa O Soberana Luz - Agnus Dei

Filipe de Magalhães was born in Azeitão, Portugal in 1571. He studied music at the Cathedral of Évora with Manuel Mendes and he was a colleague of the renowned polyphonists Duarte Lobo and Manuel Cardoso. In 1589 he replaced Manuel Mendes as mestre da Claustra da Sé. He then went to Lisbon where he was member of the Capela Real choir and then mestre de Capela da Misericórdia. On the 27th of March 1623 he was appointed mestre da Capela Real (master of the Royal Chapel), where he stays until 1641. While at Évora, he was the teacher of Estêvão Lopes Morago, Estêvão de Brito and Manuel Correia, who maintained the music school of the Cathedral of Évora in the 16th and 17th centuries. Magalhães dedicated himself to the composition of sacred polyphonic works for the liturgy. Most of them were published in collections such as the Missarum Liber, which was dedicated to Philip III of Spain (Philip II of Portugal), and the Cantica Beatissima Virgines, published in Lisbon in 1639. He also wrote a book of plainsong, Cantus Ecclesiasticus, which was published in five different editions (the first ones in Lisbon in 1614 and in Antwerp in 1642, and the last one in 1724). The catalog of the Music Library of king John IV of Portugal also mentions one 8-voice Mass, 6-voice Lamentations for the Maundy Thursday, one 7-voice Christmas villancico and five 5- and 6-voice motets. All these works were lost during the 1755 Lisbon earthquake.

micrologus2
2,515 views
19 Dec 2009
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4:21
Filipe de Magalhães: Commissa Mea Pavesco

Filipe de Magalhães was born in Azeitão, Portugal in 1571. He studied music at the Cathedral of Évora with Manuel Mendes and he was a colleague of the renowned polyphonists Duarte Lobo and Manuel Cardoso. In 1589 he replaced Manuel Mendes as mestre da Claustra da Sé. He then went to Lisbon where he was member of the Capela Real choir and then mestre de Capela da Misericórdia. On the 27th of March 1623 he was appointed mestre da Capela Real (master of the Royal Chapel), where he stays until 1641. While at Évora, he was the teacher of Estêvão Lopes Morago, Estêvão de Brito and Manuel Correia, who maintained the music school of the Cathedral of Évora in the 16th and 17th centuries. Magalhães dedicated himself to the composition of sacred polyphonic works for the liturgy. Most of them were published in collections such as the Missarum Liber, which was dedicated to Philip III of Spain (Philip II of Portugal), and the Cantica Beatissima Virgines, published in Lisbon in 1639. He also wrote a book of plainsong, Cantus Ecclesiasticus, which was published in five different editions (the first ones in Lisbon in 1614 and in Antwerp in 1642, and the last one in 1724). The catalog of the Music Library of king John IV of Portugal also mentions one 8-voice Mass, 6-voice Lamentations for the Maundy Thursday, one 7-voice Christmas villancico and five 5- and 6-voice motets. All these works were lost during the 1755 Lisbon earthquake.

micrologus2
1,975 views
19 Dec 2009
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King John IV of Portugal:

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